Current Issues of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences

Phenotypic diversity of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae isolates depending on origin and health condition

Curr Issues Pharm Med Sci., Vol. 30, No. 2, 90-99

Sylwia Andrzejczuk1, Edyta Chwiejczak2, Urszula Kosikowska1,
Dagmara Stepien-Pysniak3, Anna Malm1

Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology with Laboratory for Microbiological Diagnostics, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
2 Students Scientific Association at the Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology with Laboratory for Microbiological Diagnostics, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin, Poland 
3 Department of Veterinary Prevention and Birds Diseases, Institute of Biological Basis of Animal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Akademicka 12, 20-950 Lublin, Poland

Abstract

Background. Haemophili are common human microbiota representatives. The aim of our study was to investigate a diversity of Haemophilus spp. isolates selected from clinical specimens on the basis of biochemical characteristics, biotypes distribution, protein profiles and antimicrobial resistance.
Results. A total of 893/1025 (87%) of haemophili isolates were identified: 260/1025 (25%) as H. influenzae and 633/1025 (62%) as H. parainfluenzae. Moreover, a group of 107/1025 (10%) isolates without species identification (with e.g. abnormal numerical profile) was described as Haemophilus spp. Within the H. influenzae isolates, biotypes II and III were in a great majority (92/893; 10%, each), whereas among H. parainfluenzae, the most commonly occurring was biotype I and II (301/893, 34% and 178/893, 20%, respectively). A similar prevalence of biotypes was obtained regardless of the patient’s age or health condition or the type of specimen. A production of beta-lactamases was shown in 46/893 (5%) haemophili, both H. influenzae (13/46, 28%) and H. parainfluenzae (33/46, 72%) isolates.
On the basis of haemophili biochemical characteristics, the cluster analysis using the UPGMA method demonstrated a high degree of phenotypic similarity due to a small distances between isolates taken from both unhealthy children and adults.
Conclusion. Based on biochemical characteristics, about 90% of haemophili clinical isolates representing human-specific respiratory microbiota were positively identified as H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae. The same differences in biotypes and antimicrobial resistance among isolates selected from healthy people or from patients with chronic and recurrent diseases were detected. 

Keywords

Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, microbiota, phenotypic diversity.

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